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Great Bustard
(Otis tarda) Somerset, 2005

White Tailed Sea Eagle
(Haliaeetus albicilla) Skye, 2007

Red kite
(Milvus milvus)
Wales, 2007

Red kite
(Milvus milvus) Wales, 2007

Large Blue
(Maculinea arion) Somerset, 2007

Large Blue
(Maculinea arion) Somerset, 2007

Corncrake
(Crex Crex) Scotland, 2007

Pool Frog
(Pelophylax lessonae) Withheld, UK 2008

Pool Frog
(Pelophylax lessonae) Withheld, UK 2008

Pool Frog
(Pelophylax lessonae) Withheld, 2008

Capercallie
(Tetrao urogallus) Scotland, 2008

Goshawk
(Accipiter gentilis)Captive, 2008


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Reintroductions

Red Kite - Milvus milvus

Red kites were reduced to a small number in central Wales, and gone from England where in 1989 red kites from Spanish stock and number well over 200 birds and have spread widely in the area. Further reintroductions to Yorkshire, Northamptonshire, Newcastle area, Central Scotland and the Black Isle have been relatively sucessful.

Great Bustard - Otis tarda

The great bustard was hunted to extinction in the UK in the 1840's, but the last few years have seen a reintroduction programme onto Salisbury Plain with eggs from Russia. The birds nested in 2007 but the eggs did not hatch. But have flrdged young every year since.

Pool Frog - Pelophylax lessonae

The Pool frog became extinct in 1990's but has been subject of a reintroduction at a secret Norfolk site since 2005 where stock from Sweden have been released. A few other small populations exist in other counties.

White Tailed Sea Eagle - Haliaeetus albicilla

White Tailed Sea Eagles were exterminated from the UK in the early 1900s, in 1975 eagles from Norway were reintroduced to Mull and sucessfully bred from the mid 1980's and the population has grown slowly. Another reintroduction is currently underway on the east coast of Scotland, another in Ireland is in the final planning stages.

Sea eagles can be seen on any of the Western Isles with Mull and Skye being particular hotspots.

Northern Goshawk - Accipiter gentilis

The species was exterminated from the UK in the late 1800s and was reintroduced from central european stock and has now become well established and is slowly increasing.

New Fancy view watchpoint, Forest of Dean is one of the best sites to see them (Feb-Mar) when they are displaying.

Capercallie - Tetrao urogallus

Hunted to extinction the current population in the Speyside area of Scotland now numbers approx. 1000 pairs, these were reintroduced in the 1800's.

Loch Garten RSPB offers Capercallie watches during April and May

Corncrake - Crex Crex

Reintroduced to the Nene washes from captive bred stock to supplement the Scottish population, numbers are low with almost 300 released since the project started in 2003, they have bred which is an encouraging sign.

The Nene Washes is the only current reintroduction site

Large Blue - Maculinea arion

The Large blue became extinct in the 1970's, farming practices were primarily to blame, the reintroduction started in the early 1980's to former strongholds from Swedish stock. This has been sucessfull and it has spread. Further reintroductions to other sites has made this population the largest population in Europe.

Green Down and Collard Hill in Somerset are the public sites for this species but there are other colonies in other counties.

Black Grouse - Tetrao tetrix

The Black Grouse has been hunted along with loss of habitat to extinction in large parts of the UK and England in particular. Re introductions to parts of the Peak district, the Upper Derwent valley in particular have been sucessful and there is now a small population.

Osprey - Pandion haliaetus

Re-introduction of Scottish birds to Rutland water began in 1996 and continued until 2001, although some futher birds were brought in in 2005 the address a gender imbalance. The return rate is 22% and currently there a few breeding pairs.

Heath Fritillary - Melitaea athalia

In attempt to prevent its extinction due to habitat management changes / loss. It has been sucessfully been re-introduced into several former haunts, Kent, Essex, Devon and Cornwall as well as some others.

European Beaver - Castor fiber

The beaver became extinct in the UK a few hundred years ago, hunted by man, re-introduction is on the cards.

There are several semi wild groups (in large enclosures some several hundred acres) in various parts of the country with the sucessful re-introduction to SW Scotland in spring 2009 of animals from Norway. There are several escapees and some non authorised introductions.

Reindeer - Rangifer tarandus

Reindeer have been introduced into the an enclosure on Cairngorm in Scotland, they have minimal intervention so not truly wild but the first step.

Red Squirrel - Sciurus vulgaris

Following the eradication of grey squirrels from Anglesey, a re introduction programme has begun. Although red squirrels persisted on Anglesey, they were restricted to an isolated area of woodland and would not be able to recolonise other woodland. Red squirrels have been introduced to these and are doing well.

Short haired bumblebee - Bombus subterraneus

Some small re introductions due to start in 2011 with larged ones planned in subsequent years to areas of Kent.

Common Crane - Grus Grus

The common crane was hunted to extinction in Cranes recolonised the Norfolk Broads in 1979 and there is a slowly growing population currently numbering 35-40, these have spread naturally supplemented with continental birds and have got a toe hold in several other sites in the east of the UK. This is deemed too small and vunerable so a reintroduction was started in the Somerset levels in 2010. There are also some introduced common cranes in Norfolk but these are not officially sanctioned.

European Beaver - Castor fiber

The beaver became extinct in the UK a few hundred years ago, hunted by man, a trial re-introduction is ongoing in Knapdale in Scotland. There are also at least 20 other individuals at large mainly in Scotland.

There are also several semi wild groups (in large enclosures some several hundred acres) in various parts of the country.

Proposed Introductions

Large Copper - Lycaena dispar

Large coppers became extinct in the Uk since the mid 1800's, a re-introduction was attempted in Woodwalton fen in the mid 1900's but this ultimatly failed. Research is ongoing for another attempt probably in more extensive habitat probably the Norfolk Broads.

Moose - Alces alces

Moose have been introduced into the enclosed Alladale wilderness reserve in Scotland, not truly wild but the first step.



Black Grouse
(Tetrao tetrix) Scotland 2006

Common Crane
(Grus Grus) Germany, 2007

Common Crane
(Grus Grus) Oxon, 2007

Common Crane
(Grus Grus) Norfolk 2007

Common Crane
(Grus Grus) Norfolk 2007

Large Copper
(Lycaena dispar) Notts, 2007

Large Copper
(Lycaena dispar) Notts, 2007

Beaver
(Castor fiber) Cotswolds, 2008

Heath Fritillary
(Melitaea athalia) Essex, 2006

Heath Fritillary
(Melitaea athalia) Essex, 2006

Osprey
(Pandion haliaetus)Scotland 2007

Osprey
(Pandion haliaetus)Scotland 2007

Reindeer
(Rangifer tarandus) Scotland 2005

Moose
(Alces alces) Captive, Scotland 2008

Red Squirrel
(Sciurus vulgaris) Scotland, 2008

Red Squirrel
(Sciurus vulgaris) Scotland, 2008

Pool Frog
(Pelophylax lessonae) Norfolk, 2011
 
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Mark Hows.

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